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Hydraulic Fracturing



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Hydraulic Fracturing

What Will Fracking Do to Your Food Supply?

The controversial gas-drilling practice is tainting water. Your food might be next.
by Barry Estabrook May 14, 2011

There's a stunning moment in the Academy Award-nominated documentary Gasland, where a man touches a match to his running faucet—to have it explode in a ball of fire. This is what hydraulic fracturing, a process of drilling for natural gas known as "fracking," is doing to many drinking water supplies across the country. But the other side of fracking—what it might do to the food eaten by people living hundreds of miles from the nearest gas well—has received little attention.

Unlike many in agriculture, cattle farmer Ken Jaffe has had a good decade. But lately he's been nervous, worried fracking will destroy his business. Jaffe's been good to his soil, and the land has been good to him. By rotating his herd of cattle to different pastures on his Catskills farm every day, he has restored the once-eroded land and built a successful business with his grass-fed and -finished beef. His Slope Farms sells meat to food coops, specialty meat markets, and high-end restaurants in New York City, about 160 miles to the southeast. "If you feed your micro-herd—the bacteria and fungi in the soil—then your big herd will do well, too," he said when I visited him recently on a cool, sunny afternoon.     (READ MORE)

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Gas fracking in Arkansas

Gas fracking in Arkansas

If you have concerns about fracking (hydraulic fracturing) -- the natural gas drilling technique that is causing harm to groundwater and streams across north central Arkansas--this is an excellent opportunity to let the official state regulatory agency know what you think! The recent earthquakes near Greenbrier have been associated with the liquid drilling waste "injection wells" (dumps) where toxic fracking fluid is forced underground. The Oil & Gas Commission will be discussing the current moratorium on using the wells suspected of causing the earthquakes. This is a great opportunity for citizens concerned about gas fracking in Arkansas to turn out to express objections to the pollution and property damage occurring from gas drilling operations.     (Read More)